Why Do Mosquitoes Bite Me So Much? It Might Be Your Blood!

I hope you love this article! By the way, any links on this page that lead to products on Amazon or other vendors are affiliate links and I earn a commission if you make a purchase. Thanks in advance for your support!

In this article, we’ll answer a few popular questions about why mosquitoes bite you, such as;

  • Why do mosquitoes bite people
  • Why do mosquitoes bite certain people
  • Why do mosquitoes not bite me
  • Do mosquitoes like some blood better than others

Mosquitoes can ruin even the most beautiful summer sunset with their constant buzzing and biting.

For parents we highly recommend BuzzPatch! They use effective, but safe, essential oil combinations designed to confuse mosquitoes and hide your kids from their senses. Check them out.

Let’s go.

BuzzPatch

Why Do Mosquitoes Bite Some People More Than Others?

If you’re interested in knowing why some people receive more mosquito bites than others, even if everyone has the same amount of exposed skin, you are not alone.

Several factors may lead to these differences, such as diet, body odor, and genetic variation among individuals’ immune systems.

Below we’ll look at why some people get bitten by mosquitoes.

Blood Type

You must’ve thought at some point, ‘why do mosquitoes bite me so much but have you ever considered the possibility that mosquitoes having a preference for blood types could be one of the reasons?

Well, it’s true. Mosquitoes prefer specific proteins in our bloodstreams.

Research shows that mosquitoes have favorite blood types when targeting humans, which explains why some people get bit by mosquitoes more than others.

They most often go after type O and target people with B and A if they can’t find any of the preferred blood types in their vicinity.

A recent study showed how different people produce varying levels of these antigens, depending on their ethnic background or race. This means that some are more likely to be targeted by mosquitoes than others.

Scientists believe this is because many African Americans possess three copies of the Duffy antigen gene, whereas only about 30% of Caucasians carry two or fewer copies.

So even if we aren’t as tasty looking from an insect perspective, there are still ways they can track us down with their high-tech sensors.

Clothing

Mosquitoes can bite through fabrics, but because gauze and spandex are so thin, they’re especially vulnerable to mosquito bites.

The perfect jeans or t-shirt might not be so safe for your skin. Like yoga pants or leggings, body-hugging clothes can make it easy as pie for mosquitoes to get in contact with the skin underneath.

Loose clothing can protect you from mosquito bites as it is difficult for them to make contact with skin unless they can get in the garment. Thus, you should avoid wearing clothes with loose necklines or short pants that expose ankles.

A dark-colored shirt may be fashionable, but it also invites more bloodsucking mosquitoes. This is because the color holds in heat, attracting mosquitoes, while light colors reflect sunlight and repel them.

Gas

Most mosquito bites are often found on people who exhale more carbon dioxide. These individuals include the overweight, pregnant women, and children under six years old because they tend to breathe out large amounts of air and sweat a lot which creates an acidity that mosquitoes find irresistible.

Heat and Sweat

Mosquitoes can smell our sweat and track down humans using many different clues, including body heat and carbon dioxide. Research has recently shown that they use an olfactory receptor to detect smelly chemicals in human sweat too!

Lively Skin

The answer to why mosquitoes bite certain people also lies in the fact that mosquitoes are attracted to people who have more bacteria on their skin and prefer certain types of bacterial species.

When you brush up against someone and exchange bodily fluids like sweat while doing so, it can transfer these microbes onto you. This means you aren’t just at risk for mosquito bites because of all the blood they’ll find in your veins.

Pregnancy

Mosquitoes are attracted to pregnant women for no reason. Still, a recent study has found that it’s because these bugs can detect the changes in hormone levels and body odors during pregnancy.

Pregnant women emit higher levels of Carbon dioxide, which attract more mosquito bites. Therefore, they will be bigger targets for mosquitoes due to increased emissions during pregnancy.

Alcohol

study has demonstrated that mosquito landing and mosquito bite increases significantly after ingestion of alcohol. The reasons for this are still not clear, but you should take precautions not to be bitten by mosquitoes while drinking beer.

Sick of getting bit, well we wrote an entire guide on How To Repel Mosquitoes Naturally With Homemade Sprays check it out for some awesome tips and tricks.

What Type Of Blood Do Mosquitoes Like The Most?

Choosing your blood type is something beyond your control, and you inherit it from your parents. The different blood types include:

  • A blood type contains A antigen on the red blood cell’s surface
  • B blood type has B antigen on the red blood cell’s surface
  • AB blood type has both A and B antigen on the red blood cell’s surface
  • O blood type has neither A nor B antigen on the red blood cell’s surface

While these antigens are found on the surface of blood cells, some people also have these antigens present in their tears or saliva.

Research has shown that mosquitoes land twice as much on people with O blood type than people with A blood type. However, the same study conducted in a controlled setting also revealed that people with B blood type lie somewhere between blood type O and blood type A when it comes to mosquito bites.

Mosquitoes are also attracted more towards people who secrete chemicals through their skin, indicating their blood type. Studies show that nearly 85% percent of humans do this and emit these chemical signals, with most being secretors as opposed to non-secretors.

Thinking of spraying your yard? Read our guide to find out if mosquito repellant sprays work.

Video: Why Do Some People Get Bit By Mosquitoes More Than Others?

References:

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
  2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12083361/

Holler Box